Division

CO₂ Capture Research Division

Free-supporting nanomembranes with the world's highest performance CO₂ permeance

This research division conducts basic research and technology development mainly related to direct CO₂ capture from the atmosphere, based on separation membranes.
While the membrane separation method is expected to be most cost-effective among the CO₂ capture technologies, direct air capture (DAC) from the atmosphere has been impossible with conventional separation membranes due to their extremely low gas permeability. We have tackled these challenges and developed an innovative separation nanomembrane with an overwhelmingly high CO₂ permeability based on our original nanomembrane technology. Thus, Nanomembranes greatly elevate the possibility of capturing CO₂ from the atmosphere by membrane separation. In addition, membrane separation systems have the unique advantages of low cost, high size scalability, and they are installable anywhere. By making full use of these features, we aim to realize direct CO₂ capture from the atmosphere anywhere and everywhere (ubiquitous CO₂ collection).

  • Member

    Division Head

    Professor

    Shigenori Fujikawa

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research

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    Professor

    Shigenori Fujikawa

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research

    fujikawa.shigenori.137@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    nanomaterial chemistry, membrane science, surface science

    Keywords

    nanomembrane, nanostructure, nanomaterial chemistry, membrane science

    Research Overview
    My current research topic is to create new functional nanomaterials by controlling the material structure and size of the interface based on materials chemistry.
    In general, nanomaterials have unique properties that are different from those of bulk materials because the surface occupies a large proportion of the material. Taking advantage of this, our research involves creating various nanomaterials with structures and sizes designed by chemical approaches. In particular, we are currently focusing on the development of nanometer-thick membranes with large planar size and self-sustainability for selective CO₂ separation.

    Research Professor

    Atsushi Takahara

    Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

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    Research Professor

    Atsushi Takahara

    Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

    takahara.atsushi.150@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    Polymer Science, Surface Material Science

    Keywords

    Polymer Structure, Physical Properties of Polymers, Polymer Nanocomposites,Poymer Surface and Interfaces, Polymer Degradation and Stability, Quantumn Beam Science

    Research Overview
    On the basis of chemistry, I have been engaged in the research of structure-properties relationships of polymers.
    1) Analysis of fatigue behavior of polymeric materials based on in situ nonlinear viscoelastic measurements.
    2) Surface molecular aggregation state and surface molecular motion of polymeric solids.
    3) Precise design and physical properties of polyelectrolyte brushes.
    4) (Organic/inorganic) nano hybrids on the basis of precise interfacial design of natural inorganic nano fibers.
    5) Surface structure and properties of fluoropolymers.
    6) Analysis of structure and properties of polymers by quantum beam.
    7) Polymer degradation and stability

    Associate Professor

    Ikuo Taniguchi

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research

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    Associate Professor

    Ikuo Taniguchi

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research

    ikuot@i2cner.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    Polymer materials and science, membrane science and engineering

    Keywords

    polymer, CO₂, membrane separation

    Research Overview
    Development of “environmentally-benign” polymeric materials toward various environmental issues, such as the Global warming and Climate change has been a topic in this research group. CO₂ capture by membrane separation is one of the major targets, and the membranes developed display world top level gas transport properties. The resulting membrane is applicable for biogas upgrading and carbon-free H₂ production with the resulting methane. The membrane developed thus holds potential in CO₂ capture for Bio-Energy with CCS.
    In addition, degradable polymers with low-temperature formability can be prepared from CO₂ and renewable alcohols. These polymers can reduce energy comsumption and CO₂ emission in processing with enhancement of recyclability.

    Research Associate Professor

    Ryosuke Matsuno

    Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

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    Research Associate Professor

    Ryosuke Matsuno

    Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

    matsuno.ryosuke.240@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    polymer synthesis, polymer chemistry

    Keywords

    polymer synthesis, polymer chemistry, polysiloxane synthesis, carbon dioxide separation membrane preparation

    Research Overview
    My current research topic is synthesis of polymeric materials with new functions based on polymer chemistry. My aim is to elucidate the interaction between functional groups in polymer membranes and carbon dioxide, mainly using X-ray spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy, and to provide feedback for the material design of separation membranes.

    Assistant Professor

    Roman Selyanchyn

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research

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    Assistant Professor

    Roman Selyanchyn

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research

    romanselyanchyn@i2cner.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    material science and engineering, environmental engineering

    Keywords

    gas separation, membranes, carbon dioxide, thin-films, composites, gas sensors, polymers, hybrid materials, nanomaterials

    Research Overview
    My ongoing research is broadly devoted to the development of membranes for different gases separation. Specifically I am interested in the separation of the carbon dioxide from the complex mixtures, for example from flue gas of the conventional power plants where CO₂ should be separated from nitrogen. For membrane development I study how different polymers can be optimally assembled in the thin-film composite membranes in order to achieve efficient CO₂ separation from other gases. Also I study how advanced nanomaterials (e.g. metal organic frameworks) can be beneficially incorporated in the membranes to improve their properties. Besides the fundamental material science research I also perform chemical processes simulations to understand how the membranes should be used in realistic devices aimed to achieve wide-spread capture of the environmental CO₂.

    Research Assistant Professor

    Takeo Nakano

    Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

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    Research Assistant Professor

    Takeo Nakano

    Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

    nakano.takeo.680@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    synthetic organic chemistry, structural organic chemistry, nanomaterial chemistry

    Keywords

    π-conjugated molecule, surface chemistry, gas separation membrane

    Research Overview
    "My current study is chemical modification of the organic thin film surface to improve the CO₂ separativity.
    For ultrathin film, the surface conditions could be important factors to realize the selective CO₂ permeance. My research topc is the chemical modification of the separation membrane surface with detailed elucidation of its conditions. Additionally, the design of the molecules to improve the CO₂ separativity is also underway.
    "
    • YingJun An

      Post-doctoral Fellow

      Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

    • Nutthon Yokachuksuse

      Post-doctoral Fellow

      Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

    • Rasha Ahmed Hanafy Bayomi

      Post-doctoral Fellow

      Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

    • Chao Hung Cheng

      Post-doctoral Fellow

      Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

    • Ramadan M.M. Eljamal

      Post-doctoral Fellow

      Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

    • Adchara Padermshoke

      Post-doctoral Fellow

      Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

    • Tomoko Kajiwara

      Research Technician

      Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

    • Yuki Andoh

      Research Technician

      Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

    • Motoko Teranishi

      Supporting Staff

      Research Center for Negative Emissions Technologies

CO₂ Conversion Research Division

Catalytic nanoparticle for the conversion of CO₂ to value-added chemicals

While CO₂ is known as a greenhouse gas, it can be a precious resource of carbon. However, as CO₂ is in its most oxidized (energy-consumed) carbon state, it requires energy to be converted (reduced) to value-added carbon materials.
For this , catalyst plays an extremely important role in reducing energy use and in enhancing selectively for converting it into useful compounds. Kyushu University has succeeded in developing unique catalytic nanoparticles that convert CO₂ to methane, alcohol, ethylene, etc.
Using this technology, we are developing catalysts and devices to convert CO₂ which was collected and concentrated from the atmosphere into carbon monoxide, methane and alcohol in an electrochemical manner.

CO₂ Storage Research Division

CO₂貯蔵研究部門

Consumption of fossil resources results in the emission of CO₂ into the atmosphere. In order to permanently improve this situation, it is important not only to use the captured CO₂ (carbon neutral) but also to return the CO₂ to underground.
This technology is called CO₂ storage, and it has been applied especially at industry sites , such as thermal power plants, steel mills, and cement plants where large amount of CO₂ is emitted. As the exhaust gas contains various harmful substances, high purity of CO₂ was required for underground storage of CO₂. Processed gas by DAC, however, does not contain such harmful substances, and the gas is mainly a mixture of nitrogen and oxygen. Now the injection of such mixture of gas containing CO₂ is different from the conventional CO₂ storage process.
This division aims to establish new CO₂ storage technologies based on the high-pressure physics of this gas mixture.

Photon Energy Generation Research Division

光・エネルギー創出研究部門

Energy is required for all processes, from CO₂ capture to conversion and storage.
Sunlight is a great energy source since it is available anywhere and there is no worry about CO₂ emission. Although it is extremely important to make full use of sunlight, we have not yet achieved full-utilization of light energy effectively and only use a portion of light energy. Kyushu University is promoting world-leading research in optical science, including technologies to convert low-energy light into high-energy light and to convert light into electricity or electricity into light with high efficiency.
This will allow us to utilize sunlight, one of the ubiquitous energy sources, thoroughly.

  • Member

    Division Head

    Professor

    Nobuo Kimizuka

    Distinguished Professor / Chemistry and Biochemistry Course, Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering

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    Professor

    Nobuo Kimizuka

    Distinguished Professor / Chemistry and Biochemistry Course, Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering

    kimizuka.nobuo.763@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    supramolecular chemistry, nanomaterials chemistry, photo-functional chemistry, molecular systems chemistry

    Keywords

    self-assembly, photon energy conversion, photon upconversion, molecular solar thermal fuels, coordination polymers, molecular systems

    Research Overview
    My research work encompasses the synthesis, structure, property, and functions of molecular self-assemblies and nanomaterials, with recent focuses on photon upconversion in organized molecular systems, supramolecular solar thermal batteries, functional ionic liquids and coordination nanomaterials.

    Professor

    Chihaya Adachi

    Distinguished Professor / Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering / Director of Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA)

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    Professor

    Chihaya Adachi

    Distinguished Professor / Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering / Director of Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA)

    adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    organic optoelectronics, organic solid-state device physics, photohcemistry

    Keywords

    OLED, organic semiconductor, organic laser, organic charge-transfer, energy transfer

    Research Overview
    By mainly focusing on advanced optoelectronic devices such as organic EL (OLED) and organic semiconductor laser (OSLD), we study charge injection, charge transport, recombination, exciton generation / deactivation processes in organic solid thin-film devices. In particular, we aim to create new cutting-edge devices by clarification of CT interactions in intramolecular, intermolecular, and solid thin films. In addition, we will continue to work on the synthesis of new organic semiconductor materials, establish material designs to realize high-performance devices, and aim to create materials that can withstand practical use.

    Associate Professor

    Nobuhiro Yanai

    Graduate School of Engineering, Department of Applied Chemistry

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    Associate Professor

    Nobuhiro Yanai

    Graduate School of Engineering, Department of Applied Chemistry

    yanai@mail.cstm.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    functional chemistry of triplet state

    Keywords

    photon upconversion, hyperpolarization

    Research Overview
    We are interested in creating new functional chemistry of photo-excited triplet state. We are particularly interested in triplet-triplet annihilation-based photon upconversion (TTA-UC) for many applications ranging from renewable energy production to photodynamic therapy and optogenetics. We have also recently started a new project on triplet-DNP (dynamic nuclear polarization) towards the room-temperature hyperpolarization of biomolecules for advanced NMR/MRI technologies.

    Associate Professor

    Hajime Nakanotani

    Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA)

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    Associate Professor

    Hajime Nakanotani

    Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA)

    nakanotani@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    Organic Electronics, Photochemistry

    Keywords

    Organic Semiconductor, exciton, organic LED, organic photovoltaic

    Research Overview
    Understanding exciton behavior in organic semiconductor molecules is crucial for the development of organic semiconductor-based excitonic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaics. My current research interests focus on photochemistry and physics in the exciton of organic semiconductors to design high-performance organic semiconductor devices. I expect that the basic understanding of organic exciton reveals new possibilities for developing organic excitonic devices and molecular electronics.

    Assistant Professor

    Kiyoshi Miyata

    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science

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    Assistant Professor

    Kiyoshi Miyata

    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science

    kmiyata@chem.kyushu-univ.jp

    Research Interest

    Molecular science, Photochemistry, Ultrafast spectroscopy

    Keywords

    Excited-state dynamics, Laser spectroscopy, Quantum chemistry

    Research Overview
    I am working on cutting-edge issues in molecular science and photochemistry based on ultrafast spectroscopy. In particular, I am interested in the real-time analysis of energy conversion processes using molecular spin conversion, applying laser spectroscopy to various advanced materials such as organic semiconductors, organic-inorganic hybrid materials, and metal complexes to elucidate the unique optical functions resulted from electronic and structural interactions.

Structural Analysis and Computational Science Division

Our research center develops various new materials such as new membranes, catalysts, and photoconversion systems. In the analysis of their structure and property, these new materials especially need precise analysis at a molecular level.
In addition, material informatics and other computational approaches are inevitable for the development of a diverse group of materials.
This division collaborates with other divisions to conduct molecular-level analysis and computational science/informatics research on new materials to be developed.

  • Member

    Division Head

    Professor

    Ken Onda

    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science

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    Professor

    Ken Onda

    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science

    konda@chem.kyushu-univ.jp

    Research Interest

    spectrochemistry, photochemistry, surface science

    Keywords

    ultrafast spectroscopy, surface spectroscopy, photofunctional materials, coordination chemistry, organic thin film, catalytic reaction

    Research Overview
    My research interests are in the area of spectrochemistry using ultrashort pulse lasers. Ultrashort pulse lasers whose pulse width is less than one trillionth of second have the characteristics of short temporal width and high light intensity. These characteristics enable us to do the ultrahigh time-resolved spectroscopy and ultrahigh sensitive spectroscopy. We develop such spectroscopy systems and analyze short-lived species in photofunctional materials such as artificial photosynthesis and organic light emitting diodes as well as trace species in thin films or adsorbed on surfaces.

    Associate Professor

    Ken Kojio

    Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering

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    Associate Professor

    Ken Kojio

    Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering

    kojio@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    Polymer Science and Engineering

    Keywords

    Polymer materials, Mechanical deformation, In situ structure analyses

    Research Overview
    We have been working on chemistry and physics of polymer materials and performing polymer synthesis and investigation of structure and properties relationship of polymers. The evaluations has been done using X-ray, infrared and visible light under stimuli like stretching, heating, exposure under a certain gas.

    Associate Professor

    Daisuke Kawaguchi

    Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering

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    Associate Professor

    Daisuke Kawaguchi

    Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering

    d-kawaguchi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    Polymer Thin Films, Interfacial Engineering

    Keywords

    Polymer Structure, Thin Film Surface and Interface

    Research Overview
    Our research interests are the physical properties of polymer thin films, surface and interfaces. We study the aggregation states and thermal molecular motion of polymers at surface and interfaces or in thin films using various interface-sensitive spectroscopy. The relationship among the structure-property-function in polymer thin film devices has been discussed.

    Associate Professor

    Aleksandar Tsekov Staykov

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research

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    Associate Professor

    Aleksandar Tsekov Staykov

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research

    alex@i2cner.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    computational materials science, theoretical chemistry

    Keywords

    simulations, density functional theory, materials science, theoretical chemistry

    Research Overview
    I am using computational chemistry to investigate chemical and electrochemical processes at the surfaces and interfaces of complex oxides, carbon nanomaterials and metal nanoparticles. First-principle simulations are employed to understand electronic structures and structural properties and associate them with catalytic activity and electron / ion transport.

Future Society Design Division

Newly developed technologies will eventually be integrated into our society. For this purpose, it is important not only to aim for the world’s top-level technologies but also to verify these technologies from social engineering and economics point of view.
Legal arrangements and economic incentives will be also necessary. In addition, it is also necessary to visualize what future society will be like when these systems are introduced. Also for the commercialization of our developed technologies, product designs need to be appealing to consumers.
This division will conduct research, analysis, and designing from various perspectives, aiming at social implementation of this technology.

Strategic Division of Industrial Collaboration and Intellectual Property

The final goal of research and development activities in this center is to implement our newly-developed system into society.
This center is also linked with the “Development of Global CO₂ Recycling Technology towards “Beyond-Zero Emission, “which is a moonshot research and development project promoted by the Cabinet Office. The center also promotes industry-academia collaboration activities and makes intellectual property strategies for social implementation.

  • Member

    Division Head

    Professor

    Shigenori Fujikawa

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research

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    Professor

    Shigenori Fujikawa

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research

    fujikawa.shigenori.137@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    nanomaterial chemistry, membrane science, surface science

    Keywords

    nanomembrane, nanostructure, nanomaterial chemistry, membrane science

    Research Overview
    My current research topic is to create new functional nanomaterials by controlling the material structure and size of the interface based on materials chemistry.
    In general, nanomaterials have unique properties that are different from those of bulk materials because the surface occupies a large proportion of the material. Taking advantage of this, our research involves creating various nanomaterials with structures and sizes designed by chemical approaches. In particular, we are currently focusing on the development of nanometer-thick membranes with large planar size and self-sustainability for selective CO₂ separation.

    Assistant Project Manager

    Kimihiro Matsukawa

    Kyoto Institute of Technology Material Innovation Lab. Senior Fellow President of RadTech Japan

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    Assistant Project Manager

    Kimihiro Matsukawa

    Kyoto Institute of Technology Material Innovation Lab. Senior Fellow President of RadTech Japan

    kmatsu@kit.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    Functional material, Hybrid materials

    Keywords

    Organic-inorganic hybrid, Silicon-based polymer, Photopolymer

    Research Overview
    I had researched on the development of functional materials based on silicon polymers, organic-inorganic hybrids, and photopolymers at Osaka Municipal Technical Research Institute ((currently, Osaka Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology).After leaving the institute, I have been promoting the joint research in industry-academia collaboration as a specially appointed professor and senior fellow at Kyoto Institute of Technology. And as a program manager of JST ACCEL, I supported the project for the practical use of polymer brushes and related materials.

International Collaboration Division

The technological development pursued at this center addresses common problems faced over the world.
In order to accelerate cutting-edge researches, we will invite relevant world top-level researchers and promote international joint researches.

  • Member

    Division Head

    Professor

    Shigenori Fujikawa

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research

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    Professor

    Shigenori Fujikawa

    International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research

    fujikawa.shigenori.137@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    Research Interest

    nanomaterial chemistry, membrane science, surface science

    Keywords

    nanomembrane, nanostructure, nanomaterial chemistry, membrane science

    Research Overview
    My current research topic is to create new functional nanomaterials by controlling the material structure and size of the interface based on materials chemistry.
    In general, nanomaterials have unique properties that are different from those of bulk materials because the surface occupies a large proportion of the material. Taking advantage of this, our research involves creating various nanomaterials with structures and sizes designed by chemical approaches. In particular, we are currently focusing on the development of nanometer-thick membranes with large planar size and self-sustainability for selective CO₂ separation.
    • Paul Kenis

      Professor

      University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, UIUC

    • Benny Freeman

      Professor

      University of Texas at Austin

    • Sandra Kentish

      Professor

      University of Melbourne

    • Ho Bum Park

      Professor

      Hanyang University